Medical Research

Brain cancer Professor mentors Tasmanian researchers

Rosemary Harrup trained in Victoria and Tasmania in Medical Oncology and Clinical Haematology, completing a dual Fellowship in 2001. She is the current Director of Cancer and Blood Services at the Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH), a role she has held since 2009.

Australian Health Journal spoke to Rosemary about her journey in medicine and specifically her work in Clinical Trials in Brain Cancer and the value she placed on her senior clinicians as mentors and how she now mentors others.

SAHMRI Celebrates 10 Years of Research

SAHMRI represents an exciting and unique statewide concept, bringing together basic and translational research, South Australia’s three universities and the health system. SAHMRI works in collaboration with its partners to provide a clear focal point for health and medical research, including paving the way for new partnerships, innovative research projects and improved health outcomes.

Executive Director, Professor Maria Makrides spoke to Australian Health Journal about 3 achievements in the past 10 years that have had significant impact

International leadership breakthroughs in leukaemia research
Culturally appropriate Indigenous health research and clinical care
Omega 3 fatty acids as a preterm birth prevention

Improved treatment in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

A global clinical trial successfully reduced toxicity and side effects in advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients by using a modified treatment regimen.

Australian Health Journal spoke with Professor Mark Hertzberg in his role in the ALLG HD10 Clinical Trial and as a former Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Australasian Leukaemia & Lymphoma Group (ALLG), an organisation involved in improving the treatments and lives of blood cancer patients.

Tasmanian researchers and clinicians working together

Tasmanian medical research charity funds projects that have a global impact and improve community health and well-being.

Australian Health Journal spoke to Stephanie Furler the Chief Executive Officer of The Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation about the impact of this research locally and in global health.

Landmark brain shape study

For over a century, researchers have thought that the patterns of brain activity that define our experiences, hopes and dreams are determined by how different brain regions communicate with each other through a complex web of trillions of cellular connections.

Now, a Monash University Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health-led study has examined more than 10,000 different maps of human brain activity and found that the overall shape of a person’s brain exerts a far greater influence on how we think, feel and behave than its intricate neuronal connectivity.

Spinal implant technology eyes global opportunity

Adelaide, South Australia wants to let the secret out, and be known as hub for medical devices, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and digital health. It boasts world-class research institutions, such as the University of Adelaide and SAHMRI, fostering innovation and collaboration. The city’s supportive government policies provide incentives, grants, and streamlined regulations for businesses. Adelaide’s skilled workforce, renowned for its expertise in health sciences, offers a talent pool to drive industry growth. Additionally, the city’s strategic location, advanced infrastructure, and strong healthcare ecosystem make it an ideal base for development, manufacturing, and market access, attracting companies in these sectors.

Stroke care advances in translated research

New nurse-led protocols for stroke patients, based on ACU research, led by the Nursing Research Institute, have resulted in changes to policy, guidelines and clinical practice in Europe and Australia. The protocols were developed through the Quality in Acute Stroke Care (QASC) Trial (published in the Lancet, 2011) to manage fever, hyperglycaemia and swallowing (FeSS) post-stroke.

Message from former Australian Health Minister Hon Greg Hunt

The Honourable Greg Hunt served in the Australian Government as Minster for Health and Aged Care from 2017, previously as Industry, Innovation and Science Minister and before that the Environment Minister.

Elected as the Member for Flinders in 2001, Greg announced his retirement from politics late 2021 and in 2022, ahead of the Federal Election, having completed 20 years as a public servant.

Australian Health Journal recently caught up with Greg in a relaxed interview at his home in the Mornington Peninsula, Victoria to hear how a 9 month sabbatical has allowed him to focus on family, fitness and future. This has even included some “brutal spin cycle classes!”.

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